UNDERSTANDING, DEVELOPING STRATEGIES FOR, AND THEN IMPLEMENTING

Organizational Change Management

Coming soon! The story about how Amazon, a leading, multi-national, cutting-edge corporation will fail and collapse under the weight of its own inability to keep its eye on the ball. Hey, it happened to the best of them. It happened to Kodak when they didn’t see digital coming. It also happened to the entire camera stores sector. It happened to Epson when fax machines died. It happened to America’s shopping malls after Amazon replaced them, after they replaced Main Street. And it is happening to Amazon because they didn’t keep their eye on the ball – that would be you and I – their own customers. The introduction of this first major case study will coincide with the start of the Book of Change blog implementation. Read about what will soon be the buzz from the HBR to the WSJ.

According to the Harvard Business Review, “A recent search on Amazon.com for books on ‘change and management’ turned up 6,153 titles, each with a distinct take on the topic.” The Book of Change was created with the mission of providing the organizational change manager with a one-stop shopping website where information can be found quickly and easily. It also provides the first academically researched meta-analysis of the most prominent OCM models. This in turn has resulted in the first comprehensive, life-cycle model that involves three phases, ten steps and numerous independent actions the change manager can incorporate into their own OCM activities. The author of this publication and model brings 30 years experience as a practitioner-manager and 10 years as an academic-consultant to what is his own ongoing research mission.

      Organizational change begins with the action of the individual and is sustained by the collective actions of a group of people. In the process of writing this book, I have called on the voices of individuals who understand change. Sir Isaac Newton, a key figure in the Scientific Revolution, attained his vision, by standing on the shoulders of giants. So shall we. It is fitting that we start our journey by quoting the first individual to have ever written about change – or anything else for that matter. The Sumerian priestess Enheduanna [𒂗𒃶𒌌𒀭𒈾] wrote the first known words in literature (23rd Century, B.C.) and said, What I have done no one has done before. So it is with you and the change you are about to create.

      Managing change could be you helping your small work group change from one software program to another new and theoretically improved one. Or it could be a massive organizational change like the one that occurred in 1993 when the Clinton-Gore administration created the National Performance Review program to fundamentally reform the way the American federal government works.

        The Book of Change also includes my own contribution to the change management process. The development of the People Sustained Organizational Change Management (PSOCM) model is the culmination of 36 years of combined experience and education. This includes both private-sector consulting work and public-sector work as a practitioner. The private-sector consulting work consists of doing organizational audits with a goal of creating performance efficiencies and cost-effectiveness (as prescribed by the federal General Accounting Administration’s “Yellow Book”) in several Western states. The public-sector work was as a senior manager with city, county, regional and state government agencies in the Pacific Northwest. The doctoral studies were interdisciplinary doctoral studies in sociology, psychology and business administration at Washington State University.

      I believe the PSOCM model is the most comprehensive, life-cycle model available to the practitioner today. It is designed to address both the short-term need to resolve an existential change management threat and the long-term need to institutionalize change management thinking as an organizational and cultural mandate.

    The snowball effect of change management begins and is sustained by a group of people acting in unison. My own change management thinking has been improved by correspondence with some of the leading thinkers and writers on change management. These include Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the author of The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable and other books on the topic of existential threats and how to anticipate and mitigate them. I have also corresponded with academics such as David Carnevale, author of Organizational Development in the Public Sector and Thomas Cummings, coauthor of the foundational classic Organization Development and Change.

You manage change or change manages you. This is not some hypothesis put forth by a doctorate student. “Change” is a documented phenomena that is as much a scientific law as space or time. Wikipedia says that “Time is a component quantity of various measurements used to sequence events, to compare the duration of events or the intervals between them, and to quantify rates of change of quantities in material reality or in the conscious experience.” Just stop and ponder that sentence and  understand just how profound it is.

 

 

The doctrine of change  has been elucidated by Enheduanna  (23 Century, BC), Heraclitus (6th Century, BC), St. Augustine (4th Century, AD), to Nietzhe (19th Century, AD) to Taleb (21 Century, AD).

 

Organizational Change Management (OCM), which is translated from the Latin “norma mutatio procuratio,” is symbolized by the fourth Greek letter “delta” (uppercase Δ, lowercase δ). Change can be understood as the 5th Dimension in the spacetime continuum.  - Richard H. Carson, PhD.

Copyright 2017 by New Oregon Meridian Press

 

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

 

Printed in the United States of America

 

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Library of Congress Control Number:  2018912103

 

Carson, Richard H.

The Book of Change

Includes bibliography references and index.

ISBN-13: 978-0-692-04390-5

- Organizational psychology. I. Carson, Richard H. (Richard Carson)

© 2018 by Richard H. Carson,  PhD, MPA           Mobile:  (503) 396-9764               richcarson@psocm.org            www.richcarson.org